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Hauser & Wirth Table

  • London, UK
  • Hauser and Wirth
  • Length: 6.42m, Width: 2.18m, Height: 1.04m
  • Material: Aluminium, Finish: Mirror Finish

The studio designed a table, shelf and exhibition space to display the rarely seen smaller sculptures of British artist, Henry Moore at Hauser & Wirth’s London gallery. The parallels between Moore’s and Hadid’s work spurred the commission, as both apply the techniques of abstraction, movement and asymmetry to bring life and identity to a solid form. In the design of the gallery this was expressed in the softly curving walls of the ground floor space, which displayed drawings and paintings by Henry Moore.

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The connection between the two figures continued in the organic and mathematical intricacy of the table and shelf legs, which blended seamlessly into the level tops holding the sculptures. In this way, table, shelf, and walls were inspired by Moore’s work and formed not only a plinth for its display, but a secondary sculpture that complemented the original pieces and allowed them to be appreciated anew.

The process of creating the unique exhibition design was similar to carving a sculpture from a solid block of material. The table and shelf were made using a combination of hi-tech and traditional craftsmanship. The most advanced automotive manufacturing techniques were used to whittle solid blocks of aluminium down into the basic shapes of leg and tops. Each piece was then hand polished, welded and polished again by expert craftsmen in the Midlands to create a singular, seamless piece. Table and shelf thus became an organisation of three separate elements – this innovative feature of the design allowed the display to be rearranged after the exhibition in a variety of configurations.

 

Architect

ZAHA HADID ARCHITECTS

Design

Zaha Hadid with Patrik Schumacher

Project Team

Woody Yao, Dylan Baker-Rice